Trent Community Research Centre Project Collection

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Food security resources
Working with Meal Exchange, the authors' research surrounded food security and hunger. This research involved examining what food security is (specifically what this means from a youth lens), how this is a complex issue, how this has arisen, what is being done from a community level (specifically in Peterborough) and what resources exist that try to address these issues., by Ashley Black and Jean Haley. --, Includes: Final research paper; Suggested readings; Bibliography., Completed for: Amanda Ono at Meal Exchange; Superivising Professor: Paula Anderson, Trent University; Trent Centre for community-based education., Date of project submission: December 2006., Includes references., CAST 334H, The Canadian food system, Community-based research project.
Education and Outreach at Local Organic Farm - Project 1
By Janelle Blanchard, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Stephen Bocking; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, ERST 4840H - Community Based Research
Education and Outreach at Local Organic Farm - Project 1 [poster]
By Janelle Blanchard, Date of Project Submission: April 2016., Completed for: Trent Vegetable Gardens; Supervising Professor: Stephen Bocking; Trent Community Research Centre Project Coordinator: Matthew Hayes, ERST 4840H - Community Based Research
Kawartha Choice final research report
Kawartha Choice is currently in need of funding. This paper examines funding opportunities available to Kawartha Choice. The authors contacted nine community groups from Ontario who are promoting local food security in their region to determine structure of their organizations, their mandates, their programs and how they fund their programs: Kawartha Farm Fresh, Caledon Countryside, Local Flavours, Durham Farm Fresh, Taste the County, Toronto Food Share, Waterloo FoodLink, York Region Farm Fresh Association. Section three of this report is an analysis of the various ways that KC can fund their organization., Executive summary -- Introduction -- Section one: Research methods -- Section two: Local food organizations. Kawartha Farm Fresh. Caledon Countryside. Local Flavours. Durham Farm Fresh. Taste the Country. Toronto Food Share. Waterloo FoodLink. York Region Farm Fresh Association. EcoPerth -- Section three: Funding summary. 3.1 Structural options. 3.2 Business and community partnerships. 3.3 In-kind donations and fundraising. 3.4 Funding organizations -- Section four: Analysis of results -- Appendix 1: Questionnaire -- Appendix 2: Map -- References., by Aimee Blyth, Laura Hale and Jennifer Nantais. --, Includes: final research report; appendix; bibliography., Completed for: Stuart Harrison at Kawartha Choice; Supervising Professor: Peter Andree, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-based education., Date of project submission December 2005., Kawartha Choice was founded in 2004 and is a "grassroots, volunteer initiative that supports local farmers by promoting the wide variety of products grown in the Kawartha region," (Good Food Guide, cover)., Includes bibliographic references (p. 26)., ERST 334H, Canadian Studies, Community-Based Research Project.
Art gallery education guide
The purpose of this research project was to interview a Canadian woman artist, and create an education guide for the teachers of grade 5 students coming into the Art Gallery. The appendix is a transcript of the interview with the artist., by Thalia Bock. --, Completed for: Deirdre Chisholm at the Peterborough Arts Umbrella; Supervisor: Caroline Langill, Trent University; Trent Centre for Community-based Education., Date of project submission: April 2008., Includes bibliographic references., WMST 383H, Women's Studies, Community-based research project.
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -, Food insecurity is becoming a growing issue within the city of Peterborough. Food insecurity can be generally defined as having a lack of physical and economic access to an adequate quantity of both affordable and nutritious food. Nourish is a non-profit organization in Peterborough which seeks to improve food security within the Peterborough community by determining a single method which can be used to measure local homegrown garden harvests, in a project known as “How Much Can We Grow”. Information that can be collected from the chosen method is significant as it can help determine to what extent homegrown gardens are contributing to improving food security within the area, and encourage more individuals to become involved with gardening in the future. The following report will discuss the research results for the project and will cover the social benefits of gardening, motivations for gardening, and a single method that can be applied to the Peterborough area for measuring garden harvests. These results are based primarily on local survey responses, for a survey which was distributed throughout the Peterborough community.
How Much Can We Grow? Determining a Best Method to Measure Sidewalk/Frontyard/Backyard Garden Harvests [poster]
By Jennifer Boesche, Completed for: Nourish; Supervising Professor: Stephanie Rutherford; Trent Community Research Centre, ERST 4830Y -
Quantity of Rhamnus cathartica L. (European buckthorn) found to have a deleterious effect on vegetative abundance and diversity on the Lady Eaton Drumlin, Trent University
Acknowledgments -- Introduction. Geographical history. The Lady Eaton Drumlin. Invasive species. Rhamnus cathartica (European buckthorn). Description -- Purpose -- Methods -- Results -- Discussion. Is eradication of invasive species necessary/feasible? Regulation -- Removal methods. Uprooting. Chemical. Fire. Grazing -- In summary. Recommendations. Future studies. Additional resources. In closing -- References -- Appendix., By: Jess Bolle. --, Completed for: Trent Nature Areas. Supervising Professor: David Beresford, Trent University. Date of Project Submission: May 2012., Includes bibliographic references., Biology 3890Y: Community-Based Research Project.
Towards sustainable living in Peterborough
Acknowledgments -- Table of contents -- List of figures -- List of tables -- List of appendices -- Purpose and rationale for the study. Definition of terms. Definition of study area -- Literature review. Sustainable development. Straw bale housing. History. Benefits. Common concerns -- Methodology. Primary data collection. Sampling method pertaining to Research Question #4. Primary data analysis. Secondary data collection -- Results and discussion. Section 1: Municipal regulatory control of development. Building regulations. Section 2: Potential stakeholders. Section 3: Municipal receptiveness to sustainable development. Section 4: Opportunities and barriers -- Conclusion., by Sonya Bolton. --, A project report, submitted to Prof. A. Brunger and Prof. J. Marsh, for partial completion of Geography 470, Trent University, Monday, April 2, 2001., Clients: Mr. JP Pawliw of Generation Solar and Mr. Vince Hughes of Peterborough Green-Up., Includes bibliographic references., GEO 470: Research in Human Geography.
Spaces of racism II
Section one: Introduction -- Section two: Methodology -- Section three: Analysis -- Racism -- Sexism and gender discrimination as compared to racism -- Comparison to last year's results -- Section four: Conclusion -- Section five: Recommendations -- Appendices., by Linzy Bonham and Andres Salazar., WMST 483H
Supporting Activism in Peterborough: Building Relationships to Support OPIRG Working Groups [poster]
By Ashley Bonner and Nomaan Butt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre and OPIRG Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects
Supporting Activism in Peterborough: Building Relationships to Support OPIRG Working Groups
This paper evaluates the effectiveness of OPIRG Peterborough in supporting its working groups. The conceptual framework is built on a literature review drawing on relevant themes, policy review of PIRGS across Ontario and interviews from working group participants to identify working group dynamics and best practices. Results suggest that communication, training, networking, planning and reflection are areas in which OPIRG both demonstrated strengths and weakness. Recommendations for OPIRG staff and working group members are included. This study extends previous discussion on effective campaigning and relationships between OPIRG and working groups by implementing planning mechanisms within the working groups and offering networking opportunities on a local, provincial and PIRG to PIRG basis., By Ashley Bonner and Nomaan Butt, Date of Project Submission: April 2015., Completed for: Trent Community Research Centre and OPIRG Peterborough; Supervising Professor: Paul Shaffer; Trent Community Research Centre, IDST 4220Y - Assessment of Development Projects

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